10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (1 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (2 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (3 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (4 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (5 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (6 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (7 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (8 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (9 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (10 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (11 of 12)
10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (12 of 12)
Bridport Antiques

10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses

REF: 01/1984 / LA223166
£295
€323
$382
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Description
At the dawn of the twentieth century and the height of the Jugendstil and Art Nouveau periods a new genre of drinking glass blossomed in a small area of Bohemia centred in Austria. This was the “Flower Form” drinking glass. The technique was relatively simple; the petals, stamens and sometimes leaves of a flower were enamelled onto the out-side of the bowl of a drinking glass, often producing a quite abstract design, but when viewed looking into the bowl of the glass, a flower head was revealed in amazing beauty and detail. Prof. Has Christiansen of the Theresienthal Glass Works was a major exponent of the technique and Theresienthal glasses are especially attractive because the stems and feet are usually in green glass while the bowls are clear for the enamelling. Other factories developing the technique tended to enamel the stems in green. The period of production only lasted for perhaps the first ten years of the new century and although many factories produced the Flower Form glass and numerous different examples are recorded in collections and museums, identification and attribution are often difficult because they were seldom signed and most of the old factory records are now lost. Luckily, the pattern books of the Theresienthal factory survive and so their glasses are very well documented. Other glasses can be attributed to Fritz Heckert at the Petersdorf Glasshouse, to the Meyr’s Neffe glass houses and to the Lobmeyr factory who sometimes hid their mark within the enamelled design. These delicate glasses, each enamelled by a glass artist, were always fine luxury items and it is hard to find a surviving set of glasses today. This need not deter the collector however, as “harlequin sets” (made up from one example of each design) are far more attractive and can be built up over a period of time. Different glasses from the same maker always have a harmonious unity and were often originally sold by the factory as harlequin sets. A page from the Theresienthal pattern book shows a harlequin set that was sold in a locking gilt tray. Glasses from a variety of factories combine to form a stunning “bouquet”. It is interesting that such beautiful glasses were only made for a very limited period and that they were not imitated in any of the other factories in England, France or the rest of Europe. These Fritz Heckert glasses are probably the rarest and also the most naturalistic of all the 'Flower Form' glasses produced at the start of the 20th Century. C 1900 Heights 16 cm. Signature. Always unsigned. PLEASE NOTE THE PRICE IS PER STEM

measurements

Height:
16 CM

declaration

Bridport Antiques has clarified that the 10 Fritz Heckert 'Flower Form' Enamelled Liqueur Glasses (LA223166) is genuinely of the period declared with the date/period of manufacture being c.1900

condition

Excellent, clean and undamaged.

additional info

Material:
Enamel
Glass
Artisan:
-
Date of Manufacture:
c.1900

delivery

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location

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