9/29/2021, 1:44:59
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (1 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (2 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (3 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (4 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (5 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (6 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (7 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (8 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (9 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (10 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (11 of 12)
Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (12 of 12)
Artsonline.org.uk
Artsonline.org.uk is located in Shepton Mallet, United Kingdom

Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909

REF: LA365239
£780
€913
$1068
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Description
Awesome c1909 Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting As the above images demonstrate, this is an exceptional and original very early 1900s Marine Watercolour & Gouache Painting depicting the 207ft Extreme Tea-Clipper Sailing Ship 'Hornet' which was built by Westervelt & Mackay, New York, in 1851, and went on to have a very illustrious History as detailed below. **It was 1866** After rounding the perilous Cape Horn off South America in a short nine days, the speedy clipper ship Hornet coasted to a stop and lay becalmed in green waters just north of the equator. This was the infamous doldrums. Not a breath of air stirred under a penetrating sun, making the sailors lethargic and careless, when, on May 2, the first mate and two hands descended below deck into the stifling dark with an open flame. They needed a single cup of varnish to complete the day’s chore of polishing wood. With a twist of the cask’s spigot, the cup filled. But before the spigot was snapped off, the invisible vapours of varnish ignited, the cup was dropped, and the spigot bled fire across the floor of the hold. For an entire day, it burned, despite efforts to combat the flames, but eventually, a crewman cried, “There she goes!” and the Hornet reportedly sizzled as she sank below the surface of the sea, bow first. Stories of shipwrecks and survival have captivated people for as long as ships have sailed the seas. And Hawai‘i has seen its share of these dramas. On June 15, 1866, exclaiming “Land, ho!” 15 surviving sailors from the Hornet washed ashore at Laupāhoehoe on Hawai‘i Island, ending a 4,300-mile, 43-day nightmare. It was a story of heroism, near mutiny and near cannibalism. The news swept across the Kingdom of Hawai‘i, where a young Mark Twain wrote it down, thereby lighting a literary star that would shine for generations. On this 150th anniversary of the shipwreck of the Hornet, here’s how it all went down. As the clipper departed New York’s South Street Harbor on Jan. 15, 1866, 18-year-old Henry Ferguson heard the ice grinding against the Hornet’s sides. The East River was nearly frozen solid, thanks to a strong gale that had gripped the eastern seaboard from Nova Scotia to North Carolina and not let go. Henry found himself aboard the Hornet because of the bad health of his brother Samuel, after a doctor prescribed the warmer climes of California as the cure for Samuel’s tuberculosis. Henry gave up mansions, the opera, classes at Trinity College and the companionship of a Miss Josie Taylor to accompany his brother to San Francisco, on a 13,328-mile trek that usually took 130 days. The ship’s captain, the dependable Josiah Mitchell, 53, outfitted with an A1 manager’s rating from Lloyd’s of London, stayed up his first night at sea pointing the ship straight into a southeast gale. The sleek Hornet measured 207 feet in length, 40 feet in width and 22 feet in depth and weighed 1,326 tons. On this passage, the cargo hold carried 2,000 cases of kerosene oil, 6,195 boxes of candles, 400 tons of Pacific Railroad iron and three small steam engines. A stunning piece in every respect, and mounted within the original Oak carved and glazed frame. The image portrays this majestic vessel in very rough seas beneath a rising sunset - Just beautiful, and a wonderful historic image! Recently newly remounted with a fresh inner slip, and ready to enjoy immediately. Note: We are also selling a virtually identically framed companion painting depicting the Tea Clipper Ship 'Killeena' - please see our other listings. Attributes: Watercolour & Gouache Painting Circa: 1909-1915 ^^ Fast & Free UK Delivery Included^^ *A Certificate Of Authenticity (COA) will be provided by artsonline with this piece*

measurements

Height:
26.5 in
Width:
32.1 in
Depth:
1 in

declaration

Artsonline.org.uk has clarified that the Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 (LA365239) is genuinely of the period declared with the date/period of manufacture being 1909-1915

condition

Offered in an overall exceptional original condition commensurate with age.

additional info

Material:
Origin:
Artisan:
-
Date of Manufacture:
1909-1915

delivery

Inc FREE UK DELIVERY | Competitive Worldwide Shipping quotes available upon request

location

This Awesome Tea Clipper Ship 'Hornet' Rough Seas Seascape Watercolour Painting c.1909 is located in Shepton Mallet, United Kingdom

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